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Did you know?

Rhino can run at speeds of 45km/h and are also known as square or wide-lipped rhinoceros Mogo Zoo received its first Southern White Rhino in 2014 and is a current holding facility for two maturing males. When mature these animals will become part of the White Rhino breeding program.

Quick Facts

Weight: male 2-2.3 ton, female 1.5-1.7 ton

Size: length – 3-4m, height up to 1.8m

Number of offspring: 1 calf every 2-3yrs

Gestation: 16 months

Maturity: males 10-12yrs, females 6-7yrs

Lifespan: up to 50yrs

Predators: Humans. Lions pray on young

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Southern White Rhino

Ceratotherium simum simum

Habitat

Grassland and open savannah woodlands, preferring flat lands with bush and grass

Natural behavior

White Rhino feed and rest alternately during the day and night, often resting in the hottest part of the day. Males live in small territorial ranges. Female home ranges are larger and may overlap several male territories. Home ranges are scent posted with dung heaps, also known as middens and usually located at territory boundaries. The size of the midden represents the rhino’s status

Description

White Rhino are one of the heaviest land animals in the world. Colouration is yellowish brown to slate grey. They produce 2 horns on their snout, made from keratin which can grow up to 1.8 meters in length. White rhino have a distinct flat broad mouth for grazing. All rhinos have poor eyesight but good hearing and a good sense of smell

Distribution

Southern Africa, with smaller trans located populations found in Kenya, Namibia and Zimbabwe

Diet

Herbivore; grazing mostly on grass

Reproduction

Breeding occurs throughout the year, after courtship and mating which lasts during 1 to 3 weeks. Males use scent to determine when females are approaching estrus. The territorial bull will join the female for up to 20 days until she is ready to mate

Social structure

Mother and calf stay together for long periods, often until the next calf is born, around 3 years. Sexually mature males tend to lead solitary lives

Threats

Habitat loss and poaching, horns for use in traditional Chinese medicine